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Check Out Who is NOT in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame!

24 Aug

After you see who didn’t make it, have a look at who has been inducted

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Check Out These Musicians Before They Were Famous

3 May

1. Bee Gees       2. Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin      3. Joni Mitchell as college student      4. Young David Bowie (not available in some countries)     5. Beatles 1962      6. Stevie Ray Vaughan 1980      7. Eric Clapton 1964       8. John Mayer 1999      9. Bob Dylan first network show      10. Leon Russell 1965      11. Jeff Beck 1965      12. Paul Shaffer      13. Elvis 1955 with Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Buddy Holly      14. Aretha Franklin 1964      15. Whitney Houston     16. Barbara Dennerlein 1984 as a teenager      17. Derek Trucks @ 15      18. Beach Boys 1962  (not available in some countries)    19. Young Neil Young      20. Young Warren Haynes      21. Young Johnny Winter      22. Todd Rundgren in High School (next clip with Nazz, Todd on guitar)     23. Glen Campbell      24. Jim Seals & Dash Crofts before Seals & Crofts (on sax and drums)     25. Susan Tedeschi 1996      26. Steely Dan 1973      27. Etta James      28. Frank Zappa 1963!

 

 

The Beatles Final Tour & Paul McCartney’s First — Being there

12 Oct

It is difficult to impart to young people today what a phenomenon the Beatles were in the 1960s.  Imagine, when the Beatles appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show, 73 million people were watching, and in 1964 the US population was only 192 million!

Sullivan’s failure to scoop the TV industry with[Elvis] Presley made him determined to get the next big sensation first. In 1964, he achieved that with the first live American appearance of The Beatles, on February 9, 1964, the most-watched program in TV history to that point and still one of the most-watched programs of all time. (Wikipedia)

At 8 o’clock on February 9th 1964, America tuned in to CBS and The Ed Sullivan Show. But this night was different. 73 million people gathered in front their TV sets to see The Beatles’ first live performance on U.S. soil. The television rating was a record-setting 45.3, meaning that 45.3% of households with televisions were watching. That figure reflected a total of 23,240,000 American homes. The show garnered a 60 share, meaning 60% of the television’s turned on were tuned in to Ed Sullivan and The Beatles. Source

Their appearance on Ed Sullivan took place exactly 80 days after the funeral of John F. Kennedy, which was another event whose impact on the American public is impossible to convey to anyone who didn’t live through it.  You will often hear it said that we were in a collective state of mourning, and the Beatles appearance on Ed Sullivan was something that allowed the nation to come together with a sense of relief. Having lived through it, I agree.

In many ways the Beatles were the beginning of a universal youth culture, and they were at the center of the spirit of the 60s.

Up until this point, the world was much less interconnected.  Prior to the Beatles, with the exception of a fluke, or one-hit-wonder, it would have been unthinkable to have a British artist at the top of the US pop charts.  Our pop stars tended to have slick hair, and suddenly here were these guys from the North of England with (what was then considered) unbelievably long hair.  Consider this quote from Elvis Presley while visiting the White House in 1970:

“The Beatles laid the groundwork for many of the problems we are having with young people by their filthy unkempt appearances and suggestive music while entertaining in this country during the early and middle 1960s.”

Elvis Presley, recorded during a 1970 visit to Richard Nixon at the White House

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Breaking Bad’s Final Music

30 Sep

goodbye baby blueFor young fans of Breaking Bad who might be wondering where the final song of Breaking Bad came from, it is Baby Blue, by Badfinger.  A perfect choice.

Signed by the Beatles’Apple label in 1968 as The Iveys, they adopted the name Badfinger in 1969. Badfinger had four consecutive worldwide hits from 1970 to 1971: “Come and Get It” (written and produced by Paul McCartney), “No Matter What”, “Day After Day”, and “Baby Blue”.  Wikipedia

And if that weren’t enough, Todd Rundgren was the producer on Baby Blue:

Talkin’ Blues, Bluegrass & More with Jimmy Herring

14 Nov

Check out my interview with Jimmy Herring in All About Jazz and also my First Impressions look at his latest album Subject To Change Without Notice (Abstract Logix, 2012)

Talkin’ Blues with Jaimoe

28 Mar

Check out my new interview with Jaimoe, a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band.

Tedeschi Trucks Band: So what does Revelator reveal?

19 Jun

Two wings of equal strength endow a bird with the capacity to truly soar. This principle also helps to explain why Revelator (Sony, 2011), the debut album of the Tedeschi Trucks Band, has soared to #1 for blues releases on Amazon, #2 in rock, and #3 in all of music. This band brings together vocalist Susan Tedeschi, whose previous release in 2009 earned her a Grammy nomination, with slide guitarist Derek Trucks, who won the Grammy for his 2009 release. What’s particularly striking in this pairing is how evenly matched these exceptional talents are. Continue reading